2018 Funds for San Francisco Bay Restoration Generated from Baykeeper Lawsuits

When Baykeeper settles our Clean Water Act lawsuits with polluters, the polluters are required to make mitigation payments to help repair the damage to the ecosystem from their past pollution. These payments are used to provide grants to other nonprofit science, environmental, and community organizations working to protect and restore the San Francisco Bay watershed.

Over our 29-year history, Baykeeper has generated more than $10 million in funding for projects that are creating a healthier San Francisco Bay. During 2017-2018, Baykeeper’s successful legal settlements provided a total of $265,125 for the following projects:

All One Ocean - $1,500
To support education of communities, focusing on youth as future environmental leaders, about the destructive effect of litter on oceans and waterways and effective methods to reduce our impact.

Clean Water Action - $12,500
To support the ReThink Disposable Campaign to help businesses in Santa Clara and San Mateo Counties reduce disposable products, reduce waste, and save money.

Clean Water Fund Bay Area Environmental Justice Project- $20,000
To support data collection, community engagement, and advocacy toward new water quality standards to protect the health of communities that catch and consume the most fish from San Francisco Bay.

Grassroots Ecology - $5,625
To support improvement and protection for watersheds at three open space sites in Redwood City and East Palo Alto: Stulsaft Park, Redwood Creek and Cooley Landing.

Keep Coyote Creek Beautiful - $100,000
To support projects to clean up and restore Coyote Creek.

South Bay Clean Creeks Coalition - $100,000 
To support organized volunteer cleanups of San Francisco Bay watershed areas.

SPAWNERS - $3,500
To connect community members to their natural spaces, provide hands-on ecosystem education and the fundamentals of restoration, and foster appreciation and stewardship of the San Pablo Creek watershed.

Stand - $20,000
To support community-based challenges to the proposed expansion of the Phillips 66 marine terminal in Rodeo, which would cause a large increase in tankers carrying dangerous tar sands crude oil across San Francisco Bay.

The Wild Oyster Project - $2,000
To protect and restore Wolf Creek and its watershed to a condition of optimal health and integrity for the benefit of present and future generations.